Preface: A stentorian narrator tells us that the USA was flooded with Nazi spies in 1939-41.
At times it puts its mission ahead of its art, which results in a hodgepodge all its own. I understand the intent of the semi-documentary style, but the antiquated newsreel format is enough to put audiences to sleep alongside the combative pro-FBI story line.

Documentary-Style account of the FBI's war against nazi spies in New York city. The House on 92nd Street proves to be more of a wartime curio than the Noir it’s now marketed as.
In a surprising way, they learn who Mr. Christopher is during this rescue. You take a regular detective story, but allow the narrator to explain the procedure that the police undertake in solving the crime.

One such tries to recruit college grad Bill Dietrich, who becomes a double agent for the FBI. This can merely be how the movie begins, as in The Phenix City Story , or it could run the entire length of the film, as it does in He Walked by Night . "The House On 92nd Street" stands as a noxious example of patriotic pap disguised as faux docu film noir. … This combination of styles works seamlessly, resulting in a uniquely entertaining and informative film. One such tries to recruit college grad Bill Dietrich, who becomes a double agent for the FBI. In a nutshell, THE HOUSE ON 92ND STREET is an exciting detective story presented at times as if it were a documentary, complete with newsreel-style narration. The House on 92nd Street influenced a number of crime docu-dramas, including Anthony Mann's T-Men (1947), Jules Dassin's The Naked City (1948) and He Walked by … The House on 92nd Street Synopsis: Preface: a stentorian narrator tells us that the USA was flooded with Nazi spies in 1939-41. After they arrest the nuclear plant worker passing on the secrets, they will rescue the tortured Dietrich from the ruthless Nazis who are about to kill him in their creepy house on 92nd Street. I deign it a perfect example of a period piece in that it’s incredibly dated. The House on 92nd Street is commonly listed as a must-see entry in the film noir canon.